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Social Eating Tips

SOCIAL EATING TIPS

(contributed by Linda Anegawa, MD, FACP)

Have you ever struggled to say “NO” at family gatherings and other social events, when you’re offered food that you know is not good for you?

It’s a fact that even when loved ones know you’re trying to lose weight and get healthier, we often feel pressured to make a bad choice, have seconds, or eat dessert.  This doesn’t necessarily mean that others want to sabotage you or ruin your success – it can just be history, culture, and a habit of food being a gift to share with those you love.

Here are some things you can say at social gatherings to stay on track with your wellness goals, when you’re offered something you don’t want to eat:

“I sure wish I could have some!  But I’m so full, from all the other delicious food right now.  Maybe a little later.”

“Thanks, I’ll pass and just keep you company while you enjoy!”

“No, thank you” (firmly, without explanation at all).

When offered seconds: “No, thank you, it was delicious.  Can I have the recipe?”

“No thanks.  Hey, how are your kids doing – I haven’t seen them lately!” (diversion tactic!)

“You know, I realized that my stomach doesn’t feel good when I eat _____, so now I try to avoid feeling like that.”

“I have _____ (high cholesterol, prediabetes, etc.) so I’m making changes in what I eat to improve my health.”

“My doctor told me I can’t eat that, but it smells amazing!”

If you feel a need to explain, or are pushed further, you can say “Sorry, that just doesn’t agree with me” or “Sorry, I need to choose what I eat more carefully for my health.”

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How to Survive Cold and Flu Season on a Low-Carb Diet

How to Survive Cold and Flu Season on a Low-Carb Diet

(contributed by Linda Anegawa, MD, FACP)

Have you noticed everyone around you is starting to sniffle and sneeze?  Here are some tips to prevent getting sick, and what to do if you do end up with a bug.

1. Prevention is key! Keep your water intake up. If you aren’t getting the minimum 64oz. of water per day start with that as your goal. Then add more water until you are drinking 1⁄2 your body weight in ounces of water every day! Drinking lots of fluids, water, unsweetened tea, clear broths, & rehydration solutions like Powerade Zero may help.

2. Wash your hands frequently and wipe down your keyboards, door handles and phones.  Carry hand sanitizer wherever you go and use it frequently.

3. Medications & Remedies: If you do get sick, look out for carbs and sugars in over-the-counter medications and treatments.   Always read the labels on medications and look for the ones that are sugar-free or low in sugar. Did you know 1 pack of Emergen C has 5 carb grams including 4 grams of sugar. A cough drop has 3 or 4g of carbs – so popping 10+ a day will add 30g of carbs or more. Nyquil liquid has 19g of carbs per serving!  When in doubt, ask your pharmacist whether a medication is sugar-free and alcohol-free.

4. Brands to try: Hyland’s DEFENSE Cough & Cold (sugar free, dye free, alcohol free) OR Theraflu Sugar Free Nighttime Severe Cold & Cough, OR Nyquil capsules- not liquid form.  There’s also Hall’s Sugar Free Honey and Lemon (no aspartame!).  Remember, while these may be sugar free, you should still limit them as much as possible. Compare labels of all brands and look for carbs and sugars hidden in the medications! Tylenol, aspirin, and ibuprofen can also be helpful if needed.  One of the simple solutions to relieving throat symptoms rather than purchasing these medications is by gargling salt-water solution. Simply mix 1⁄2 teaspoon of salt in a cup of water. What’s more, you’ll save money.

5. Foods to eat: Try plain chicken broth, soft boiled eggs and unsweetened hot tea.  Stevia-sweetened electrolyte drinks like Vitamin Water Zero can help keep up your hydration and soothe sore throats.

6. Rest! You’ve heard it before but getting enough rest and sleep every day will help in your recovery. When the body is sleeping, it’s healing!

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Can I drink Alcohol on a Low Carb Diet?

Can I Drink Alcohol on a Low Carb Diet?

(contributed by Linda Anegawa, MD, FACP)

The short answer:  yes, but…

First, discuss with your doctor whether the use of alcohol may negatively impact your health.  Potential dangers include interacting with medications you may be taking and/or worsening certain chronic conditions you may have such as fatty liver, gout, and hypertension.

Should you and your doctor feel that occasional alcohol is safe for you, it can be enjoyed in moderation as part of a low carb lifestyle.  For example, there are lower-carb alcohol options that you can choose such as dry wines and spirits.  You can also use sugar-free mixers to enjoy low-carb variations of your favorite drinks like a rum and diet coke or a Moscow Mule made with diet ginger beer.

Remember however, that even if your doctor feels moderate alcohol is safe for you, it still can stall or greatly slow weight loss.   

General rules for alcohol use with low-carb diets:

  1. Choose dry wines (cabernet, pinot noir, chardonnay, Chablis, zinfandel), champagnes, spirits and (very) low carb beer if any beer at all. Remember to only combine with sugar-free mixers.

  2. Limit your consumption. Too many drinks can not only add up in calories from the alcohol but also limit your ability to steer clear of the dessert tray or reaching for snacks when you’re not hungry. Know the size of your pour and be aware of your limit!  We generally advise patients to stay under 1 drink per day.

  3. Try to avoid dessert wines like ports and sherries due to high sugar content. Likewise, avoid fruit-flavored cocktail mixers and dark beers.