The Science of Gut Sensory Modulation (GSM)

GSM is an emerging science, discovered by scientists who observed and studied hormonal changes that occur following gastric bypass surgery, specifically, higher levels of the hormones GLP-1 and PYY. These hormones, released by intestinal L-cells, act as satiety signals to the brain. GSM targets L-cells in the lower gut with natural ingredients to produce a wide range of beneficial effects.

Bariatric surgery which results in satiety, weight loss, and amelioration of type 2 diabetes, also dramatically enhances gut hormone secretion. This hormone enhancement is a result of delivering nutrients to the lower bowel a region of the gut where hormone secreting L-cells are most abundant. Gut hormones are known to mediate many of the beneficial effects of gastric bypass surgery.

Additionally, new evidence suggests that nutrient-driven gut hormone secretion can be augmented by non-nutritive agonists to nutrient chemosensory (taste) receptors located in the intestine. Taste receptors are chemosensory receptors that transmit and convey the perception of taste for bitter, sweet, umami, salt and sour. The same taste receptors located on the tongue also exist in other organs including the lung and gut epithelium. Targeting intestinal taste receptors on L cells with non-nutritive agonists to augment meal-driven gut hormone secretion is a novel approach to manage bodyweight. Taste receptor agonists can exert biological and pharmacologic actions without being absorbed into the bloodstream, thus reducing the potential for off-target side-effects. This more natural approach to the management of healthy bodyweight represents an attractive opportunity for continuing research.